Book review: On a Beautiful Day by Lucy Diamond

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On a Beautiful Day
By Lucy Diamond
★★★★
Pub date: 11th January 2018
Publisher: Pan Macmillan

Every year, Lucy Diamond publishes a new book and when January comes, I am always excited wondering what she will be releasing in the months to come. On a Beautiful Day is her latest novel and tells the story of four friends who meet for a birthday lunch up in Manchester. But then, they witness a shocking accident just metres away and this acts as a catalyst for each of them.

For Laura, it’s a wake-up call to heed the ticking of her biological clock. Sensible Jo finds herself throwing caution to the wind in a new relationship. Eve, who has been trying to ignore the worrying lump in her breast, feels helpless and out of control. And happy-go-lucky India is drawn to one of the victims of the accident, causing long-buried secrets to rise to the surface.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

I LOVE Lucy Diamond’s novels and On a Beautiful Day didn’t disappoint me. Her books are like a sunny morning in the middle of January and they all make me turn the pages and smile.

To be honest, I didn’t read the blurb before starting the book – I just trust Diamond that much – so it was very exciting and interesting seeing the events unfold before my eyes. After reading so many thrillers in a row, I was craving a bit of the good feeling that come after a nice chick-lit title and this one was like sunshine.

Lucy knows how to write and the chapters are easy to follow. She guides the reader through the facts and also explains what is going on inside their heads, which really makes you connect with the characters and her feelings.

After they witnessed the terrible accident, our four friends try to continue with their lives but what they saw will have consequences. All of them have a story to tell and all of them contribute to the plot in a different way. I see the characters as the various stages that a woman could face throughout her life: Laura is thinking about babies and getting pregnant, Eve’s marriage broke apart and she’s starting a new relationship, India realises that you cannot run away from your past but have to face it and resolve it instead and Eve will deal with a complicated diagnosis that is going to turn around the way she looks at life.

This book is brilliant and it made me smile all the way through. Although I am younger than the characters in the novel, I see myself in the way they think and act. This is why I think On a Beautiful Day is another success for Lucy Diamond. It is a novel about the unexpected turns that life can take. It is about luck, (good and bad, of course!) and about finding yourself when your world seems to be falling apart.

Above all this is a novel about friendship, hope, love and the city of Manchester.

If you haven’t read any of Diamond’s novels, I’d recommend you start from the beginning and enjoy all of them! Summer at Shell Cottage, The Year of Taking Chances and The House of New Beginnings have been my favourite ones so far!

You can read more about the author here.
Don’t forget to grab your copy!

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Book review: Not Working by Lisa Owens

Not Working
By Lisa Owens

9781509806546

Publication: 21/04/2016
Hardback
Publisher: Picador, Pan Macmillan
★★★

Lisa Owens’ novel was one that I was really looking forward to read. Luckily, one of my colleagues told me she had a proof copy – the perks of working in the publishing industry, right? – and she was going to let me read it. Bless her, that made my day.

Not Working presents Claire Flannery – the heroine of the story – who has voluntarily quit her full time job in London in order to discover her true vocation. However, she soon realises that… she has no idea how to find it! All the new extra time that comes with being unemployed only encourages her to dwell on the uncertainties of her life. While everyone around her seems to have their lives entirely under control, Claire finds herself sinking under pressure and wondering where her own fell apart.

‘It’s fine,’ her grandmother says. ‘I remember what being your age was like – of course, I had four children under eight then, but modern life is different, you’ve got an awful lot on…’

———

Picador really knows how to promote a book and they have done amazingly well with this one. When I read the synopsis I realised that – even though I had (and have!) an awful (and lovely) lot of books to read – I was going to put everything on the side and try to find out what Claire Flannery was all about.

I saw the novel a few times at different Waterstones and I couldn’t help to admire its cover, with those unusual bright colours. The thing is when you see a book with this kind of  jacket, you know it’s going to be something special. Indeed, the subject and the heroine seem to break with traditions and even the way Owens has written her book is quite peculiar.

The novel’s format presents the story through short vignettes and thoughts under headings which at first I found a little bit off-putting. However, as I settled into it, I found myself really enjoying it. It is true that a character like Claire, this kind of anti-heroine who doesn’t know what she wants and seems to be lost in the modern world, can be found in previous titles such as The Diary of Bridget Jones but I don’t agree with reviewers who have stated that Claire is the new Bridget. They are completely different characters and the reasons why they decide to quit their jobs are definitely not the same. As far as I can remember, Bridget Jones leaves her publishing job because she doesn’t want to be next to her boss Daniel after he lied to her. On the other hand, Claire leaves because she wants to try to find herself which is a completely different reason – and a better one! Whether she succeeds or not – you’ll have to find out by reading the book… of course!

Having said this, I must add that – even though I liked the book and the way the author presents the story – I was expecting so much more. It ended quite suddenly and I was left with this weird ‘is-that-it?’ kind of feeling.

So many good things were said about the novel that I genuinely thought it was going to be unique and made me laugh out loud. It didn’t. It’s a funny book, don’t get me wrong, and it’s very well written but I still cannot see what all the hype is about. Definitely a good read and something you’ll enjoy. I don’t think this book will ‘change your life’ , though. But then again… not all books are meant to do so. Some of them are meant to make you smile and have a good time.

And this is what Not Working did for me.