Book review: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz
By Heather Morris

★★★★
Pub date: 11th January 2018
Publisher: Bonnier Zaffre

I try to read as many books as I can and some people will understand me when I say that my to-read list increases by the day. I buy books when I still got tons at home. This one I didn’t buy, though. I received the ebook from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. So here it goes:

The Tattooist of Auschwitz tells the incredible story of the Lale, the Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist and the woman he loved.

Lale Sokolov is well-dressed, a charmer, a ladies’ man. He is also a Jew and this is why he is taken from his home country, Slovakia, to Auschwitz in 1942. In the camp, he is looked up to, looked out for, and put to work in the privileged position of Tätowierer– the tattooist – to mark his fellow prisoners, forever. One of them is a young woman, Gita, who steals his heart at first glance.

His life given new purpose, Lale does his best through the struggle and suffering to use his position for good. This is the story of Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov, a real-life Holocaust survivor. 


When I was around 17 years old, I read The Diary of Anne Frank, a book that changed my life. It’s true,  Anne’s story changed me for good and during many years I studied and read a lot about Second World War: how it developed, its repercussions and of course the Holocaust. I’ve read multiple non-fiction titles on the matter and I also visited Auschwitz and Auschwitz II Birkenau in Poland many years ago. No soul is prepared to learn about what happened there.

When I read about The Tattooist of Auschwitz on social media, I instantly knew I wanted to read this one but I honestly didn’t expect to find such a story.
Full of beauty and hope, the book is based on years of interviews that author Heather Morris conducted with Lale Sokolov, our protagonist.

Throughout the chapters we learn about Lale, where he comes from, his family, his feelings and how he ends up becoming the tattooist of Auschwitz. We discover how was life in the concentration camp and we are present when he first meets Gita and falls in love with her. The omniscient narrator helps us understand what is going on at all times and that’s why I never found myself lost in the story.

This is a difficult story that will keep the reader hooked from its very beginning. What is going to happen to Lale? Will he see Gita next week? Is it true what they say about the gas chambers? Will he live to see another day? The Holocaust is a difficult topic but it is something that it’s important to know – and read – about.

The message that the book gives us is heart-wrenching, illuminating and unforgettable. In fact, Lale’s story is unforgettable – just as all of the stories of those who ended up in a concentration camp during the war.

What I liked the most was not only that it was beautifully written but that the book is based on a true story. So yes, it is history and real facts and it is about love and about friendship and about sadness, and joy. It’s about our history – one that we all hope will never repeat itself.

Lale’s and Gita’s story is worth knowing so thank you, Heather, for putting it down on paper. And thank you to the publishers for seeing the potential of this book and bringing it to life.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz will be published in January 2018.
You can pre-order your copy here

I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much to the publisher, it was extraordinary.

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Book review: Happy People Read and Drink Coffee by Agnes Martin-Lugand

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Happy People Read and Drink Coffee
by Agnes Martin-Lugand

★★★★
Edition: Paperback
Published: 07/07/2016
Publisher: Allen & Unwin

The first time I saw this book was in Waterstones Piccadilly, in London, and I loved the title, really – and the cover. I didn’t buy it then, though. A friend of mine mentioned it last month when I was visiting Madrid and it was then when I decided to give it a go…

The book tells the story of Diane, who has  a charmed life as a wife and mother and who is the owner of a literary cafe in Paris called Happy People Read and Drink Coffee. But when Diane suddenly loses her husband and daughter in a car accident, her whole world is shattered. Trapped and haunted by her memories, Diane withdraws from friends and family, unable and unwilling to move forward.

A year after the accident, Diane shocks her loved ones by leaving Paris to move to a small town on the Irish coast to rebuild her life alone. There she meets Edward, a brooding, handsome photographer who lives next door. Initially Edward resents Diane’s intrusion into his solitary life, but before long they find themselves drawn to each other . . .

– – – – – – –

This is a heartbreaking and uplifting story and I can say that I loved every word. It is an easy read in the sense that the story moves fast but it is also very sad to read what happens to Diane and how she lives after the car accident because she is clinically depressed and doesn’t work. She also spends her days in bed, drinking coffee, smoking and remembering her husband and daughter. However, when she decides to leave Paris and moves to Mulranny, in Ireland, her life changes.

Yes, she finds a new man. Edward but even though I really liked Diane, I found him very rude and disturbing but I must say I did like how their story develops. I won’t tell how it ends but I admire this book because it shows hope and bravery. It is not unrealistic and Diane doesn’t move on, forgets her husband and finds a new love in a short period of time – instead, the story focuses on how she finds herself again, her path and how she grows to accept what has happened to her.

Highly recommended, this is an enlightening novel that won’t leave you indifferent. I couldn’t have found a better novel to finish 2016 – because after the hard year that we’ve left behind, this book has shown me that there’s still hope, and a reason to keep fighting.

You can read more about Happy People Read and Drink Coffee here.
And if you feel like reading it, click here to buy the book.