Book review: Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham

9780007515547.jpg

Not That Kind of Girl
by Lena Dunham

★★★★
Edition: Paperback
Published: 23/02/2017
Publisher: Fourth State

 

I have read loads of books since the beginning of 2017. Well, not as many as I’d have liked but it’s been a busy year. However, I wanted to share with you my thoughts on a particular book that made me smile and laugh. It made me feel nostalgic and I ended up taking it everywhere with me: to the office, on the tube and even to some dates with my boyfriend where I hoped to have the chance to open it up while I waited for him to arrive…

This book claims to be for readers of Nora Ephron, Tina Fey, and David Sedaris and it is a collection of hilarious, poignant, and extremely frank  personal essays written by Lena Dunham – the acclaimed creator, producer, and star of HBO’s ‘Girls’.

– – – – – – – – –

If you type ‘Lena Dunham’ or ‘GIRLS’ on Google, you would find thousands of sites about them. There is so much that is being said on both the author and her series. What is true and what isn’t? You need to find out for yourself and create your own opinion, and that’s what Lena Dunham has taught me: it is fine to have your own voice so in spite of all the bad reviews out there, let me tell you that I found this book witty, interesting, charming and funny. The book is divided in essays and yes, I got lost in some of them but eventually I found myself again, laughing so much I thought I was going to cry.

I’ve run into a lot of people who don’t like Lena Dunham. In reality, I didn’t find her that interesting at the beginning either. I thought – is her only purpose to appear naked in every episode of her series? But you know what? I don’t really care. There are so many hot girls who appear naked everywhere and what if she wants to show her own body and put herself out there? I say YES to that. She’s hot and intelligent and deserves credit not only for the series she created, but for the lessons she teaches everyone of us.

Yes, that is her. Yes, she puts herself out there and shows everyone that you shouldn’t (even for one second) be ashamed of who you are. Even if you are not a size 8, if you have anxiety, OCD or kissed a girl back when you were at school. So what? You are gold, and precious and kind.

And no, this book didn’t changed my life but I enjoyed it. I found myself there (as I am sure a lot of people did) and Lena Dunham has some great life lessons to teach us all. If you liked GIRLS, give it a go because you’ll like this. She lives up to her voice and that’s nice.

So here’s to you Lena, five big, shiny stars.

You can read more about Not That Kind of Girl here
And if you feel like reading it, click here to buy the book.

 

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Book review: Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

Finding Audrey
by Sophie Kinsella

9780857534583

Edition: Hardback
Publisher: Random House Children’s Publishers UK
★★★★★

Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella was a book that I remember seeing on the shelves numerous times. Its attractive and mysterious cover made me think of Audrey Hepburn but the truth is, I never really looked at it properly. It was one of my colleagues who told me about the author and her books and highly recommended it. So when I found a hardback copy of the novel at YALC’s book swap last summer, I decided to give it a go. And I’m very happy I took the time to find Audrey, really.

Sophie Kinsella’s first YA novel revolves around a fourteen-year-old girl who cannot leave her house. This is, of course, Audrey. An anxiety disorder disrupts her daily life and she wears sunglasses all the time. She can’t even take off her sunglasses inside the house. Then her brother’s friend Linus stumbles into her life. With his friendly, orange-slice smile and his funny notes, he starts to entice Audrey out again – well, Starbucks is a start. And with Linus at her side, Audrey feels like she can do the things she’d thought were too scary. Suddenly, finding her way back to he real world seems achievable. Be prepared to laugh, cry, dream and hope with Audrey as she learns that even when you feel you have lost yourself, love can still find you…

– – – – – – – – –

I loved this book so much!  The above blurb does not make it justice, I promise. Finding Audrey has been recently been added to my All-Time-Favourites and it will remain there. There’s no much I can say except that it is funny – I was laughing out loud while reading it – that I loved the characters (all of them) and that it is believable, sweet and inspiring. This book raises its voice and presents the reader with a main character who suffers from an anxiety disorder, a main character who is depressed – and that, I think, is really powerful.

This is not your typical YA novel – mind you, give me a typical YA novel any time! – and that is very beautiful. Yes, there is Linus and the feelings she develops for him but the book is much more than that: it’s a story about courage, family, respect, understanding, support, friendship, mental health and finding oneself. Please, read it – this book is SUNSHINE.

Book review: The Boyfriend List by E. Lockhart

The Boyfriend List*
By E. Lockhart
* 15 guys, 11 shrink appointments, 4 ceramic frogs – and me, Ruby Oliver

9781471405969

Publication: 14th July 2016
Paperback / eBook
Publisher: Hot Key Books – Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

I love a good YA novel; that’s a fact. So when I saw we were publishing this title by E. Lockhart (the first one in the Ruby Oliver series) I couldn’t help myself: I needed to grab a copy!

This funny title revolves around Ruby Oliver, aka Roo – who is fifteen and has a shrink. It’s just because she’s had a pretty awful past ten days, though. During this period of time he has: lost her boyfriend (#13 on the boyfriend list), lost her best friend, lost all her other friends, did something suspicious with a boy (#10), did something advanced with a boy (#15), had an argument with a boy (#14), drank her first beer (someone handed it to her), got caught by her mom (ag!), had a panic attack (scary), lost a lacrosse game, failed a math test, hurt Meghan’s feelings, became a social outcast, and had graffiti written about her in the girls’ bathroom. Ruby lives to tell the tale, though. Through a special assignment to list all the boys she’s ever had the slightest, little, any-kind-of-anything with, comes an unfortunate series of events that would be enough to send any girl in a panic.

– – – – – – – –

This book really (really) hooked  me and it was very difficult for me to put it down.I felt trapped!

It’s YA at its best; a book in which the author explores some of the challenges of being a teenage girl: boys, highschool, gossip, dances and female friendships.

Ruby is extremely funny and I like that the author doesn’t present her as a perfect character: she makes mistakes, she doesn’t appreciate her real friends or her parents enough and she hangs on to boys for all the wrong reasons.
But when she starts seeing Doctor Z, she clearly begins to understand what’s going on around her – and learns a few good lessons along the way.

Despite the great amount of boys in this book –  in fact, there are so many that I lost track of which one Ruby was talking about -I learnt a lot because of the message that is present in the story and what can be read between the lines: the effects of toxic relationships, gossip, fake friendships and their influence in mental health and dating patterns.

Lockhart is fantastic; and her writing style is super funny and witty. If you enjoy YA, give it a go – for real. And don’t forget there are 3 more books in the series…

  • The Boy Book
  • The Treasure Map of Boys
  • Real Live Boyfriends

Book review: Mad Girl by Bryony Gordon

Mad Girl
By Bryony Gordon

9781472232083

Publication: 7th June 2016
Hardback / eBook
Publisher: Headline Publishing Group

Mad Girl – Bryony Gordon’s latest book – is everywhere, just as The Wrong Knickers was when it came out a couple of years ago. And now I understand why.

Just so you know a bit more about this title…

Bryony Gordon has OCD. It’s the snake in her brain that has told her ever since she was a teenager that her world is about to come crashing down: that her family might die if she doesn’t repeat a phrase 5 times, or that she might have murdered someone and forgotten about it. It’s caused alopecia, bulimia, and drug dependency. And Bryony is sick of it. Keeping silent about her illness has given it a cachet it simply does not deserve, so here she shares her story with trademark wit and dazzling honesty. It’s time for her to speak out. Writing with her characteristic warmth and dark humour, Bryony explores her relationship with her OCD and depression as only she can.

– – – – – – – – –

 I LOVED this book. It made me laugh and it made me cry and it showed me reality. In a world of social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat) – in which all that matters is your pretty, happy and smiley face – it’s so INSPIRING to find someone who speaks up and makes you realise that hey, it’s OK not to be OK.
You are not weird. You are not alone. In fact, you’re perfectly normal.

Bryony Gordon is just fantastic and does wonders with her writing. Mad Girl is shocking, funny, heart-wrenching. And then again, that’s what it’s supposed to be: a celebration of life with mental illness, a positive attitude against adversity and the revealing truth about the importance of loving oneself.*

This book is just extraordinary.
Thank you, Bryony.

* A very well-known fact that no one puts into practice or cares about.

Book review: London Belongs To Us by Sarra Manning

London Belongs To Us 
by Sarra Manning

26177619

Publication: 02/06/2016
Paperback / eBook
Publisher: Hot Key Books, Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

The first time I heard about this book was during my first week at Bonnier Zaffre and most of my colleagues seemed excited about this new title by author Sarra Manning. Oh, okay – I thought – another book about London, another girl-meets-boy  book in which they will discover the marvellous city they live in. And well, no need to say I was -obviously – completely wrong.

London Belongs To Us tells the story of seventeen-year-old Sunny, who has always been a little bit of a pushover. However, when she’s sent a picture of her boyfriend kissing another girl, she know she’s got to act. The story presented in the novel presents the reader with a mad, twelve-hour dash around London – starting at 8pm in Crystal Palace (so far away from civilisation you can’t even get the Tube there) then sweeping through Camden, Shoreditch, Soho, Kensington, Notting Hill… and ending up at 8am in Alexandra Palace.

Along the way Sunny will meet a whole host of characters she never dreamed she’d have anything in common with – least of all the handsome (and somewhat vain) French ‘twins’ (they’re really cousins) Jean Luc and Vic. But as this love-letter to London shows, a city is only a sum of its parts, and really it’s the people living there who make up its life and soul. And, as Sunny discovers, everyone – from friends, apparent-enemies, famous bands and even rickshaw drivers – is willing to help a girl on a mission to get her romantic retribution.

– – – – – – –

I started reading Sarra’s novel when I was having my hair done in a terrible, terrible place near Kilburn Park station. I had forgotten my book at home but luckily, I was carrying my eBook reader with me and I remembered I had London Belongs To Us ready to be discovered. And what a marvellous read!

As someone who has moved to London from another country, I am fascinated by this city and I find really interesting to discover new things about it. The main character of this novel is young, funny and loves London more than anything else. Her enthusiasm for the city is contagious and the way in which she tells the story is brilliant!  I loved that each chapter in the book began with the name of a place in London followed by a description of its history because it was very interesting to learn more about it.

I also liked to see London’s diversity playing a key role in the book – because if there’s something great about the city, that is its diversity and also the respect that flows throughout its streets – and how the author succeeds in making London a character itself.

I was trapped from the very beginning and laughing out loud all the way through. The plot is fast-paced (the whole story takes place within 12 hours) and is full of fantastic descriptions of people’s feelings. The writing is exceptional – I am already looking forward to reading some other books written by the author – and the characters are adventurous and engaging.

I gave it four stars because I didn’t find the end as satisfying as I’d have loved to. There was something missing there! However, that’s just how I felt about it: some people have told me that the ending didn’t disappoint them and that they really liked it!

I guess you’ll have to read it in order to find out.

May you all have fun with Sunny around London!

Book review: Birdy by Jess Vallance

Birdy
by Jess Vallance

25269375

Publication: 02/07/2015
Paperback
Publisher: Hot Key Books, Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

I have been reading lots of books lately so there’s various reviews that I have to share on my blog but I wanted to post this one first not only because I enjoyed the book but also because it’s been a while since I read a YA novel and this is one that captured my attention from the very beginning.

Birdy is the story of Frances Bird, a teenager who has been a loner for so long that she’s given up on ever finding real friendship. However, when she’s asked to show a new girl – Alberta – around school, she begins to think her luck could finally be changing. 

Eccentric, talkative and just a little bit posh, Alberta is not at all how Frances imagined a best friend could be. But the two girls click immediately, and it’s not long before they are inseparable. Frances could not be happier.

As the weeks go on, Frances finds out more about her new best friend – her past, her secrets, her plans for the future – and she starts to examine their friendship more closely.

Is it, perhaps, just too good to be true?

– – – –

Nothing can prepare you for this darkly compulsive tale of friendship and obsession; I mean it: nothing. I’ve always been a great fan of YA but Birdy is different from anything I’ve ever read before.

The book started out as a usual high school story but became creepier and creepier as the chapters went on.
As mentioned in the synopsis, the whole book revolves around Frances and her friendship with Alberta. Frances narrates the story and presents the reader with different episodes about their days at school, the time they spend together hanging around and how their friendship develops. I thought all these episodes would have a strong meaning and that some truth was going to be revealed but they don’t- which I found a bit frustrating – and they are there just to entertain the reader.

As I kept reading I started to feel uncomfortable with Frances and her way of thinking. Just as one of they many reviews on goodreads affirms: ‘the more you read the more messed up it becomes until you’re left seriously disturbed’. Well, I couldn’t agree more. This book is notoriously dark.
Frances – who in the beginning seems like a ‘normal’ teenager who lives with her grandparents and has always been quite lonely – becomes obsessed with her new friend and controls everything she does. She is manipulative and becomes terribly fixated with the idea that Alberta is ‘hers’.

Another aspect that I would like to mention is the writing because I found it addictive. I finished the book in two days – honestly, I couldn’t put it down. It’s not very long and it’s a very well-written YA novel which ending horrified me.

I know I have said it before but I ended up terribly disturbed! I didn’t expect such a shock! And I loved it.  The story ends with a magnificent (and very dark) twist which the reader won’t see coming. 

Jess Vallance’s new book – The Yellow Room  will be published in August 2016 (Hot Key Books) and I am already looking forward to it.

Book review: Not Working by Lisa Owens

Not Working
By Lisa Owens

9781509806546

Publication: 21/04/2016
Hardback
Publisher: Picador, Pan Macmillan
★★★

Lisa Owens’ novel was one that I was really looking forward to read. Luckily, one of my colleagues told me she had a proof copy – the perks of working in the publishing industry, right? – and she was going to let me read it. Bless her, that made my day.

Not Working presents Claire Flannery – the heroine of the story – who has voluntarily quit her full time job in London in order to discover her true vocation. However, she soon realises that… she has no idea how to find it! All the new extra time that comes with being unemployed only encourages her to dwell on the uncertainties of her life. While everyone around her seems to have their lives entirely under control, Claire finds herself sinking under pressure and wondering where her own fell apart.

‘It’s fine,’ her grandmother says. ‘I remember what being your age was like – of course, I had four children under eight then, but modern life is different, you’ve got an awful lot on…’

———

Picador really knows how to promote a book and they have done amazingly well with this one. When I read the synopsis I realised that – even though I had (and have!) an awful (and lovely) lot of books to read – I was going to put everything on the side and try to find out what Claire Flannery was all about.

I saw the novel a few times at different Waterstones and I couldn’t help to admire its cover, with those unusual bright colours. The thing is when you see a book with this kind of  jacket, you know it’s going to be something special. Indeed, the subject and the heroine seem to break with traditions and even the way Owens has written her book is quite peculiar.

The novel’s format presents the story through short vignettes and thoughts under headings which at first I found a little bit off-putting. However, as I settled into it, I found myself really enjoying it. It is true that a character like Claire, this kind of anti-heroine who doesn’t know what she wants and seems to be lost in the modern world, can be found in previous titles such as The Diary of Bridget Jones but I don’t agree with reviewers who have stated that Claire is the new Bridget. They are completely different characters and the reasons why they decide to quit their jobs are definitely not the same. As far as I can remember, Bridget Jones leaves her publishing job because she doesn’t want to be next to her boss Daniel after he lied to her. On the other hand, Claire leaves because she wants to try to find herself which is a completely different reason – and a better one! Whether she succeeds or not – you’ll have to find out by reading the book… of course!

Having said this, I must add that – even though I liked the book and the way the author presents the story – I was expecting so much more. It ended quite suddenly and I was left with this weird ‘is-that-it?’ kind of feeling.

So many good things were said about the novel that I genuinely thought it was going to be unique and made me laugh out loud. It didn’t. It’s a funny book, don’t get me wrong, and it’s very well written but I still cannot see what all the hype is about. Definitely a good read and something you’ll enjoy. I don’t think this book will ‘change your life’ , though. But then again… not all books are meant to do so. Some of them are meant to make you smile and have a good time.

And this is what Not Working did for me.

Book review: Shadows of the Workhouse by Jennifer Worth

Shadows of the Workhouse
By Jennifer Worth

9780753825853

Publication: 22/01/2009- London, United Kingdom
Paperback
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
★★★★★

Shadows of the Workhouse is the second title in the Call The Midwife Trilogy written by Jennifer Worth. In this follow up to Call the Midwife – which first published in June – Jennifer Worth, a midwife working in the East End of London in the 1950s, tells more stories about the people she encountered.

_______

After my experience reading Jennifer Worth’s first book, I was very much looking forward to this one and I must say that it didn’t disappoint me. Not a tiny bit! The paperback is available to buy from Amazon and bookshops but I bought myself the Kindle edition.

This sequel continues the story that was first started in Call The Midwife, and revolves around Jennifer’s memories of Nonnatus House, the nuns that lived and worked there, the people she met and treated, and life in the docklands in the 1950s.

The complete title of the book is Shadows of the Workhouse: The Drama of Life in Postwar London and I was eager to start reading it because I thought I’d find the same kind of stories I did in Call The Midwife. I didn’t. Shadows of the Workhouse is, in fact, a much darker book and much sadder as well. Jennifer’s writing remains the same – light and beautiful – but the stories she remembers throughout the pages are blue and truly heartbreaking.

In the book you’ll find Jane, who cleaned and helped out at Nonnatus House and was taken to the workhouse as a baby. Then there’s also Peggy and Frank’s story; their parents both died and they were left destitute. At the time, there was no other option for them but the workhouse. You’ll also meet Reverend Thornton-Appleby-Thorton, a missionary in Africa who visits the Nonnatus nuns. And then there’s Sister Monica Joan and her shoplifting habits… which, in the end, will take her to court.

Shadows of the Workhouse is definitely harder to read than its predecessor -the stories it explores are very tragic – but it also reveals the reality of workhouses and life as it truly was in postwar London.
Jennifer Worth’s memories  help the reader to learn a bit more about the history of England and how society was organised. If you like history, you’d love to read about these and you’ll learn while you read – which sounds very boring but it really isn’t?

The BBC TV series brought this title to the screen by mixing its stories with more pleasant ones – and not everything was presented as remembered by the author- so I’d definitely recommend giving these books a go, instead of just relying on the TV portrayal of her memories. Her stories give a fascinating insight into the resilience and spirit that enabled ordinary people to overcome their difficulties. It’s a powerful book,  based on powerful memories and written by a powerful author. It’s sad I only have one title left to read in the series…

 

Book review: Maestra by L.S.Hilton

Maestra
by L.S. Hilton

9781785760037

Publication date: 10/03/2016
Hardback
Publisher: Zaffre Publishing
★★★★

I first heard about Maestra on my way to work. It was a normal day and I was on the bus checking my emails when I came across my daily subscription to The Pool. I guess it was the red cover what made me open the article and author interview, I don’t know… but I recognised the book because I had seen adverts on the tube and it appeared to be all over the media. I suppose I decided to read it because I wanted to know why people kept talking about it. Was it really that good? What was I missing? And also because my current employer told me I should give it a go. And so I did. I bought the e-book on a Thursday night and devoured it in less than a week.

The book tells the story of Judith Rashleigh, an art-lover and assistant who works in a prestigious London auction house. Her dreams of breaking into the art world have been gradually dulled by the blunt forces of snobbery and corruption. To make ends meet, she starts working as a hostess in one of the West End’s less salubrious bars. Desperate to make something of herself, she learns to dress, speak and act in the interests of men. She learns to be a good girl. However, after uncovering a conspiracy at her action house, she is fired before she can expose the fraud. In desperation, she accepts an offer from one of the bar’s clients to accompany him to the French Riviera. But when an ill-advised attempt to slip him sedatives has momentous consequences, Judith finds herself fleeing for her life. 

Now alone and in danger, all Judith has to rely on is her consummate ability to fake it amongst the rich and famous – and the inside track on the hugely lucrative art fraud that triggered her dismissal.

 

————-

I’ve never been an avid reader of crime fiction / thrillers, I tend to read non-fiction titles, YA and women’s fiction so this was the first time I met a character like Judith. And I never came across such a story before, no kidding.

I felt like the book, in the very first pages, uncovers the story little by little. Judith narrates it and I felt very close to her in the first chapters: working as an assistant, trying to develop herself, describing rush hour and struggling to get the life she knows she’s always wanted. Feelings of distance and fear started to grow as I kept on reading. I didn’t understand Judith and her morally complex personality but her wicked intelligence made me want to keep reading and discover what was going to happen.

Her story is full of explicit sex and murders – I was surprised because the main character doesn’t seem to have feelings of remorse or sadness. She is a dark, dark character but that’s her best quality too. She doesn’t disappoint, in fact, she surprises the reader every so often that I kept asking myself: ‘What is she going to do now’?

L.S. Hilton sets her story in Europe and it’s beautiful to travel from place to place, including London, Italy and France. Her descriptions are vivid and there’s moments where you cannot wait to turn the page in order to discover what’s going to happen. It is an incredibly addictive story that has many layers. However, some of those layers are truly unrealistic and exaggerated. So be prepared to feel sceptical about what happens to our protagonist.

I must confess I don’t like Judith – nor her tastes or ambitions – And that’s one of the greatest things about her: she doesn’t need anyone to like her, not even the reader. She has great psychological depth, though:  she is vivid, unrelenting, scary and leaves destruction behind her.

And the twists, oh! the twists in the book are magnificent. There’s no way the reader can be prepared to discover what happens in the story. The world of art is fascinating, the fraud and corruption and the murders make this story a delicious dark thriller that will ‘shock and please in equal measure’.

This little red book is a must read and I am looking forward to discover what happens next. Does Maestra live up to the expectations? In my opinion, it does. The book is, however, strong in graphic sexual content and if this is likely to perturb you, then be prepared. I would suggest to read the book with an open mind and you won’t be disappointed.

Now, now… can someone bring me Maestra‘s sequel?

Book Review: Call The Midwife by Jennifer Worth

In my last blog post, I made clear that I wanted my new site to be truthful, to reflect what goes through my mind on a day to day basis and I’ve been thinking there’s no better way to do it than by sharing my opinion and thoughts on the books I get to read. You see, working for the publishing industry has its perks…

Call The Midwife: A True Story of the East End in the 1950s
by Jennifer Worth

9780753823835

Publication date: 06/03/2008 – London, United Kingdom
Publisher: Orion Publishing Group
Imprint: Phoenix
★★★★★

The first time someone spoke to me about Call The Midwife, they were talking about the famous BBC series starring – among others – Jessica Raine, Miranda Hart, Helen George, Bryony Hannah and Laura Main and which focuses on a group of nurse midwives working in the East End of London in the late 1950s and early 1960s. It never occurred to me there could be a book behind the episodes and that I was actually watching the memories of a real midwife – Jennifer Worth – who did really work in the East End of London in the 1950s and 1960s. I should’ve known, honestly. It’s funny how many movies and series do come from books lately, right?

The series was charming and truly moving so it didn’t took me very long to know I desperately wanted to read the book.

Call the Midwife is the first book in a series, followed by Shadows of the Workhouse and Farewell to the East End. They were all written by Jennifer Worth, who came from a sheltered background when she started working as a midwife in the Docklands in the 1950s.
London’s East End was then characterised by tight-knit family communities, strange characters and a lively social scene. It was into this world that the author entered, a world where the conditions in which many women gave birth were horrifying. Not only because of their impoverished surroundings and lack of medical assistance, but also because of what they were expected to endure. In her series of books, Worth recounts her time working as a midwife, witnessing brutality and tragedy but also encountering kindness and understanding. Attached to an order of nuns who had been working in the slums since the 1870s, the author tells the story not only of the women she treated, but also of the community of nuns and the nurses and midwifes with whom she trained.

———–

After watching the series, I didn’t know what to expect from Jennifer Worth’s first book but I was very much looking forward to reading it. And now that I’ve finished, I cannot wait to read the other two.
Jennifer Worth’s memories are so vivid and real that they take you back in time to the 1950s to one of the poorest areas in London. It is true that I’ve always liked reading memoirs and biographies but Worth’s words are somehow special. What I really like about the book is that the author doesn’t disguise reality and explains in detail how things were, even if they were horrid, obscene or repulsive. Her descriptions bring to life a long gone era, where family values where different, were people faced poverty, disease and painful situations and were women were the heroines of it all.

Some of the author’s memories were brought to the screen but some of them didn’t and that was interesting to discover. Her stories are beautifully told and some of them developed in a complete different way that what the BBC portrayed. Films / TV and books are not the same – nor they have to be – so it seems obvious that there was going to be differences between the way Worth’s stories are represented.

As I was devouring the pages, I felt nostalgic and I wished I could have seen it all. I wished I could speak Cockney and get to know the nuns who lived in Nonnatus House – a pseudonym, of course. I liked the way the author helped people and the way she admits she was not a saint – she describes her feelings of disgust, anger and revulsion towards some people she met, the mistakes she made along the way as well as the East Ender’s amazing tenacity, their traditions and their warmth and humour in the face of hardship.

The book is easy to enjoy and the descriptions didn’t seem long or boring – even though sometimes that’s the case of non-fiction titles. I actually found myself wanting to know what was going to happen to the characters – the nuns, the midwifes, the prostitutes, the expectant mothers – and discovering a beautiful side of Jennifer, one that is not understood in the TV series. Indeed, I really liked the way she speaks about the nuns, the way she first thought their religion is a joke and the way she realises – little by little – the important labour that these women were doing, helping people because they believed in something greater and felt love and peace within themselves.

Having said this, I truly recommend giving this little book a go, it kept me wanting to read even during rush hour and I already miss the characters and people I discovered between the pages. Thankfully, there’s still two more titles in the series.