Book review: Close to Home by Cara Hunter

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Close to Home
By Cara Hunter
★★★★★
Pub date: 14th December 2017
Publisher: Penguin Random House UK

I finished this book last week and I am still thinking about it. It’s just too good to be true. I have been reading a lot of thrillers / crime novels recently but this one… this one will really stay with me.

The story revolves around Daisy Mason, an eight-year-old who vanishes from her family’s Oxford home during a costume party. Detective Inspector Adam Fawley knows that nine times out of then, the offender is someone close to home. And Daisy’s family is certainly strange – her mother is obsessed with keeping up appearances, while her father  is cold and defensive under questioning. And then there’s Daisy’s older brother, so withdrawn and uncommunicative…

DI Fawley works against the clock to find any trace of the little girl, but it’s as if she disappeared into thin air–no one saw anything; no one knows anything. But everyone has an opinion, and everyone, it seems, has a secret to conceal.

But how can a child go missing without trace? They’re all certain it was Daisy on a flower costume at the party…

– – – – – – – – – – – – –

I wasn’t expecting Cara Hunter’s first novel to be so good. I didn’t plan to get so hooked but this thriller was really incredible.

I really liked how the book was plotted and developed. Nothing is what it appears in this investigation but Hunter knows how to guide us (through flashbacks and interviews) in order to gain insight into Daisy’s family and what led to her disappearance.

The chapters and events move quickly and in an engaging manner. I felt completely part of the plot and I found myself questioning the incidents, interviews and suspects at all times. The way in which the author presents our current social media trends was also fascinating – with Facebook and Twitter posts that represent the public opinion while the suspects undergo trial.

The writing is crisp and immersive and the story feels real. I was completely hooked, reading chapters fast, wanting to know what happened and who was responsible. I also liked DI Fawley and his team – how they gathered the information and came up with clues and evidence.

As the chapters went by, I kept changing my mind and couldn’t decide who the perpetrator was. I was clueless, I honestly had no idea – and that was brilliant because it kept me intrigued, wanting to find out the truth.

You’re in for a real twist when the book comes to its end too!
Congratulations to the author, this was just brilliant! I cannot wait to read her new book – In the Dark – which will be published in July 2018.

Grab your copy of Close to Home here!

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Book review: The Choice by Dr. Edith Eva Eger

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The Choice – Embrace the Possible
By Dr. Edith Eva Eger
★★★★
Pub date: 7th September 2017
Publisher: Ebury Publishing, PRH UK

I have a lot of books to read. I carefully update my Goodreads’ lists when I hear about a title that sounds interesting and I add it to my to-read pile so… when I finished I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh and felt in the mood for something different, I scrolled down my list and found this one. The title and synopsis sounded promising so I decided to buy the eBook and see where it was going to take me.

This book is Edith Eger’s memoir. In 1944, when she was only sixteen years old, Edith and her family were sent to Auschwitz. There, she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith’s bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.

Today, Edith Eger is an internationally acclaimed psychologist whose patients include survivors of abuse and soldiers suffering from PTSD. In The Choice, she shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since.
In her memoir, Edith also explains how many of us live within a mind that has become a prison, and shows how freedom becomes possible once we confront our suffering.
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I had never heard about the author before reading her book but she really is remarkable. And so is The Choice, which I can only describe as beautifully-written, warm and compassionate.

The book is organised into four sections: Prison, Escape, Freedom and Healing. In the first three, Dr. Edith Eger tells us her story and shares her experiences in Auschwitz, what happened when the II World war was over, how she found her way back home and how her life evolved as a survivor. It would be enough for her to just share the events that she witnessed and how she coped with the pain and sorrow but Edith Eger goes further. In Healing, she tells us about her experiences with her patients and the truths she’s discovered along the way.

Edith Eger will make you change your way to look at your life and your choices. She’ll make you realise that there is no hierarchy when it comes to suffering and that everyone’s pain needs to be addressed. She does not judge. Instead, she tries to help people to be free and liberate them from the prisons they’ve created in their minds.

Only us hold the key that will allow us to be free and to do that, we have to take responsibility for our lives. Life is about choices and today, in this present moment, we cannot change what we did, what happened to us or the choices we made. But we can choose how to live now. Everyone has had to deal with the consequences of making bad choices bur we cannot judge ourselves, we have to release ourselves from judgement, accept our feelings and reclaim our innocence, loving ourselves for what we truly are ‘human, imperfect and whole’.

There’s so much power and strength within us. And, as Dr. Edith Eger says, we can choose to be free.

A story to remember and re-read in the months to come – there’s so much I still want to learn from the author.

You can read more about The Choice here
Don’t forget to get your copy on Amazon!

Book Review: Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton

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Everything I Know About Love
By Dolly Alderton
★★★★
Pub date: 1st February 2018
Publisher: Penguin

I don’t know how I first came across this book, or who mentioned it on Twitter or how I found who Dolly Alderton is but I am so glad I did.

Alderton is an award-winning journalist who has written for numerous publications including The Sunday Times, The Telegraph, GQ, Marie Claire, Red and Grazia. From 2015-2017 she was a dating columnist for The Sunday Times Style. She is co-host of The High Low Show, a weekly pop culture and current affairs podcast, and also writes and directs for television. This is her first book and… who would have thought?

– – – – – – – – – – –

I enjoy reading non-fiction titles so much (!) but it’s true that it takes me longer time to go through them. I guess fiction is easier to get hooked on. This didn’t happen with Everything I Know About Love, though. Dolly Alderton’s first book is funny (and serious), silly (and smart), sweet (and sour) happy (and sad), and above all, it made me feel whole.

First of all, Alderton can write and what I mean by this is that some of her paragraphs felt so real that I decided to write them down in my own journal. I could relate to her feelings and to so many of her cultural references (internet / MSN messenger / living in a damp flat in London…etc). This is a selling point of the book because, as the chapters go by,  the author’s experiences become your own and she has the power to make you feel exactly what she is feeling: it doesn’t matter if you are from London or Barcelona, if you are 20 or 44, if you are timid or outgoing or if you are a party girl or spend your nights relaxing at home–  We’ve all gone through what Dolly’s explaining in her memoir.

The author has tried it all (really) and, in the book, she vividly recounts falling in and out of love, wresting with self-sabotage, getting drunk, going to therapy, getting dumped, finding a job… – in fact, she recalls what is like to become a grown-up *with all its highs and lows*.
Throughout the chapters, Alderton made me laugh. And she made me cry.
I also started recognising some of her behaviours in myself and understood the importance of loving oneself and this was her best lesson. The author taught me things that I already thought I knew – and it was a great discovery.

‘This is a book about bad dates, funny nights out, messy days, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough’ and I couldn’t have said it any better myself.

If you only read a book next year, you have to make it this one!

You can read more about Dolly Alderton here.
And don’t forget to get your copy here!

 

I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much to the publisher, it was wonderful!

Book Review: It Started with a Tweet by Anna Bell

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It Started with a Tweet
By Anna Bell
★★★★
Pub date: 7th December 2017
Publisher: Bonnier Zaffre

When it comes to books, I read loads of different genres but oh… give a chick lit novel anytime! I adore Lucy Diamond’s books (particularly The House of New Beginnings and The Year of Taking Chances) so I was excited when I got a digital copy Anna Bell’s new book. Bell is well known for being the author of The Bucket List to Mend a Broken Heart (Bonnier Zaffre, £7.99) and has been named as the new ‘queen of romantic comedy’.

It Started with a Tweet tells the story of Daisy Hobson, who literally lives her whole life online. A marketing manager by day, she tweets her friends, instagrams every meal and arranges (appalling) dates on Tinder. But when her social media obsession causes her to make a catastrophic mistake at work, Daisy finds her life going into free-fall…
Her sister Rosie thinks she has the answer to all of Daisy’s problems – a digital detox in a remote cottage in Cumbria, that she just happens to need help doing up. Soon, too, Daisy finds herself with two welcome distractions: sexy French exchange-help Alexis, and Jack, the brusque and rugged man-next-door, who keeps accidentally rescuing her.

But can Daisy, a London girl, ever really settle into life in a tiny, isolated village? And, more importantly, can she survive without her phone?

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

When I started reading the book I hadn’t had a look at the the blurb so I didn’t know what the book was about but that’s exactly what I liked about it – I was not expecting anything that happened in the story and it turned out to be one of the funniest books I’ve read all year.

I liked its warmth and the characters, particularly our heroine, Daisy (she’s just hilarious) and her sister Rosie. I could relate to the journey they both go on in so many ways. It’s a journey of self-discovery that is not only well-written but also believable. I also liked the romantic elements of the story (of course) and didn’t expect a few things that happened with both Alexis and Jack.

The descriptions of Cumbria and the beautiful English countryside were something I really enjoyed. They took me back to the time I spent in Yorkshire surrounded by  green fields and being taken back there was wonderful, tbh.

This book is chick lit at its best with a good lesson hidden between the pages.
Five stars (also because I read it when I needed it most).

You can read more about It Started with a Tweet by clicking here.
And don’t forget to get your copy here!

I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much to the publisher, it was the funniest of books!

Book review: The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz
By Heather Morris

★★★★
Pub date: 11th January 2018
Publisher: Bonnier Zaffre

I try to read as many books as I can and some people will understand me when I say that my to-read list increases by the day. I buy books when I still got tons at home. This one I didn’t buy, though. I received the ebook from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. So here it goes:

The Tattooist of Auschwitz tells the incredible story of the Lale, the Auschwitz-Birkenau tattooist and the woman he loved.

Lale Sokolov is well-dressed, a charmer, a ladies’ man. He is also a Jew and this is why he is taken from his home country, Slovakia, to Auschwitz in 1942. In the camp, he is looked up to, looked out for, and put to work in the privileged position of Tätowierer– the tattooist – to mark his fellow prisoners, forever. One of them is a young woman, Gita, who steals his heart at first glance.

His life given new purpose, Lale does his best through the struggle and suffering to use his position for good. This is the story of Ludwig (Lale) Sokolov, a real-life Holocaust survivor.


When I was around 17 years old, I read The Diary of Anne Frank, a book that changed my life. It’s true,  Anne’s story changed me for good and during many years I studied and read a lot about Second World War: how it developed, its repercussions and of course the Holocaust. I’ve read multiple non-fiction titles on the matter and I also visited Auschwitz and Auschwitz II Birkenau in Poland many years ago. No soul is prepared to learn about what happened there.

When I read about The Tattooist of Auschwitz on social media, I instantly knew I wanted to read this one but I honestly didn’t expect to find such a story.
Full of beauty and hope, the book is based on years of interviews that author Heather Morris conducted with Lale Sokolov, our protagonist.

Throughout the chapters we learn about Lale, where he comes from, his family, his feelings and how he ends up becoming the tattooist of Auschwitz. We discover how was life in the concentration camp and we are present when he first meets Gita and falls in love with her. The omniscient narrator helps us understand what is going on at all times and that’s why I never found myself lost in the story.

This is a difficult story that will keep the reader hooked from its very beginning. What is going to happen to Lale? Will he see Gita next week? Is it true what they say about the gas chambers? Will he live to see another day? The Holocaust is a difficult topic but it is something that it’s important to know – and read – about.

The message that the book gives us is heart-wrenching, illuminating and unforgettable. In fact, Lale’s story is unforgettable – just as all of the stories of those who ended up in a concentration camp during the war.

What I liked the most was not only that it was beautifully written but that the book is based on a true story. So yes, it is history and real facts and it is about love and about friendship and about sadness, and joy. It’s about our history – one that we all hope will never repeat itself.

Lale’s and Gita’s story is worth knowing so thank you, Heather, for putting it down on paper. And thank you to the publishers for seeing the potential of this book and bringing it to life.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz will be published in January 2018.
You can pre-order your copy here

I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much to the publisher, it was extraordinary.

Book review: Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham

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Not That Kind of Girl
by Lena Dunham

★★★★
Edition: Paperback
Published: 23/02/2017
Publisher: Fourth State

 

I have read loads of books since the beginning of 2017. Well, not as many as I’d have liked but it’s been a busy year. However, I wanted to share with you my thoughts on a particular book that made me smile and laugh. It made me feel nostalgic and I ended up taking it everywhere with me: to the office, on the tube and even to some dates with my boyfriend where I hoped to have the chance to open it up while I waited for him to arrive…

This book claims to be for readers of Nora Ephron, Tina Fey, and David Sedaris and it is a collection of hilarious, poignant, and extremely frank  personal essays written by Lena Dunham – the acclaimed creator, producer, and star of HBO’s ‘Girls’.

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If you type ‘Lena Dunham’ or ‘GIRLS’ on Google, you would find thousands of sites about them. There is so much that is being said on both the author and her series. What is true and what isn’t? You need to find out for yourself and create your own opinion, and that’s what Lena Dunham has taught me: it is fine to have your own voice so in spite of all the bad reviews out there, let me tell you that I found this book witty, interesting, charming and funny. The book is divided in essays and yes, I got lost in some of them but eventually I found myself again, laughing so much I thought I was going to cry.

I’ve run into a lot of people who don’t like Lena Dunham. In reality, I didn’t find her that interesting at the beginning either. I thought – is her only purpose to appear naked in every episode of her series? But you know what? I don’t really care. There are so many hot girls who appear naked everywhere and what if she wants to show her own body and put herself out there? I say YES to that. She’s hot and intelligent and deserves credit not only for the series she created, but for the lessons she teaches everyone of us.

Yes, that is her. Yes, she puts herself out there and shows everyone that you shouldn’t (even for one second) be ashamed of who you are. Even if you are not a size 8, if you have anxiety, OCD or kissed a girl back when you were at school. So what? You are gold, and precious and kind.

And no, this book didn’t changed my life but I enjoyed it. I found myself there (as I am sure a lot of people did) and Lena Dunham has some great life lessons to teach us all. If you liked GIRLS, give it a go because you’ll like this. She lives up to her voice and that’s nice.

So here’s to you Lena, five big, shiny stars.

You can read more about Not That Kind of Girl here
And if you feel like reading it, click here to buy the book.

 

Book review: Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

Finding Audrey
by Sophie Kinsella

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Edition: Hardback
Publisher: Random House Children’s Publishers UK
★★★★★

Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella was a book that I remember seeing on the shelves numerous times. Its attractive and mysterious cover made me think of Audrey Hepburn but the truth is, I never really looked at it properly. It was one of my colleagues who told me about the author and her books and highly recommended it. So when I found a hardback copy of the novel at YALC’s book swap last summer, I decided to give it a go. And I’m very happy I took the time to find Audrey, really.

Sophie Kinsella’s first YA novel revolves around a fourteen-year-old girl who cannot leave her house. This is, of course, Audrey. An anxiety disorder disrupts her daily life and she wears sunglasses all the time. She can’t even take off her sunglasses inside the house. Then her brother’s friend Linus stumbles into her life. With his friendly, orange-slice smile and his funny notes, he starts to entice Audrey out again – well, Starbucks is a start. And with Linus at her side, Audrey feels like she can do the things she’d thought were too scary. Suddenly, finding her way back to he real world seems achievable. Be prepared to laugh, cry, dream and hope with Audrey as she learns that even when you feel you have lost yourself, love can still find you…

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I loved this book so much!  The above blurb does not make it justice, I promise. Finding Audrey has been recently been added to my All-Time-Favourites and it will remain there. There’s no much I can say except that it is funny – I was laughing out loud while reading it – that I loved the characters (all of them) and that it is believable, sweet and inspiring. This book raises its voice and presents the reader with a main character who suffers from an anxiety disorder, a main character who is depressed – and that, I think, is really powerful.

This is not your typical YA novel – mind you, give me a typical YA novel any time! – and that is very beautiful. Yes, there is Linus and the feelings she develops for him but the book is much more than that: it’s a story about courage, family, respect, understanding, support, friendship, mental health and finding oneself. Please, read it – this book is SUNSHINE.

Book review: The Boyfriend List by E. Lockhart

The Boyfriend List*
By E. Lockhart
* 15 guys, 11 shrink appointments, 4 ceramic frogs – and me, Ruby Oliver

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Publication: 14th July 2016
Paperback / eBook
Publisher: Hot Key Books – Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

I love a good YA novel; that’s a fact. So when I saw we were publishing this title by E. Lockhart (the first one in the Ruby Oliver series) I couldn’t help myself: I needed to grab a copy!

This funny title revolves around Ruby Oliver, aka Roo – who is fifteen and has a shrink. It’s just because she’s had a pretty awful past ten days, though. During this period of time he has: lost her boyfriend (#13 on the boyfriend list), lost her best friend, lost all her other friends, did something suspicious with a boy (#10), did something advanced with a boy (#15), had an argument with a boy (#14), drank her first beer (someone handed it to her), got caught by her mom (ag!), had a panic attack (scary), lost a lacrosse game, failed a math test, hurt Meghan’s feelings, became a social outcast, and had graffiti written about her in the girls’ bathroom. Ruby lives to tell the tale, though. Through a special assignment to list all the boys she’s ever had the slightest, little, any-kind-of-anything with, comes an unfortunate series of events that would be enough to send any girl in a panic.

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This book really (really) hooked  me and it was very difficult for me to put it down.I felt trapped!

It’s YA at its best; a book in which the author explores some of the challenges of being a teenage girl: boys, highschool, gossip, dances and female friendships.

Ruby is extremely funny and I like that the author doesn’t present her as a perfect character: she makes mistakes, she doesn’t appreciate her real friends or her parents enough and she hangs on to boys for all the wrong reasons.
But when she starts seeing Doctor Z, she clearly begins to understand what’s going on around her – and learns a few good lessons along the way.

Despite the great amount of boys in this book –  in fact, there are so many that I lost track of which one Ruby was talking about -I learnt a lot because of the message that is present in the story and what can be read between the lines: the effects of toxic relationships, gossip, fake friendships and their influence in mental health and dating patterns.

Lockhart is fantastic; and her writing style is super funny and witty. If you enjoy YA, give it a go – for real. And don’t forget there are 3 more books in the series…

  • The Boy Book
  • The Treasure Map of Boys
  • Real Live Boyfriends

Book review: Mad Girl by Bryony Gordon

Mad Girl
By Bryony Gordon

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Publication: 7th June 2016
Hardback / eBook
Publisher: Headline Publishing Group

Mad Girl – Bryony Gordon’s latest book – is everywhere, just as The Wrong Knickers was when it came out a couple of years ago. And now I understand why.

Just so you know a bit more about this title…

Bryony Gordon has OCD. It’s the snake in her brain that has told her ever since she was a teenager that her world is about to come crashing down: that her family might die if she doesn’t repeat a phrase 5 times, or that she might have murdered someone and forgotten about it. It’s caused alopecia, bulimia, and drug dependency. And Bryony is sick of it. Keeping silent about her illness has given it a cachet it simply does not deserve, so here she shares her story with trademark wit and dazzling honesty. It’s time for her to speak out. Writing with her characteristic warmth and dark humour, Bryony explores her relationship with her OCD and depression as only she can.

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 I LOVED this book. It made me laugh and it made me cry and it showed me reality. In a world of social media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat) – in which all that matters is your pretty, happy and smiley face – it’s so INSPIRING to find someone who speaks up and makes you realise that hey, it’s OK not to be OK.
You are not weird. You are not alone. In fact, you’re perfectly normal.

Bryony Gordon is just fantastic and does wonders with her writing. Mad Girl is shocking, funny, heart-wrenching. And then again, that’s what it’s supposed to be: a celebration of life with mental illness, a positive attitude against adversity and the revealing truth about the importance of loving oneself.*

This book is just extraordinary.
Thank you, Bryony.

* A very well-known fact that no one puts into practice or cares about.

Book review: London Belongs To Us by Sarra Manning

London Belongs To Us 
by Sarra Manning

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Publication: 02/06/2016
Paperback / eBook
Publisher: Hot Key Books, Bonnier Zaffre
★★★★

The first time I heard about this book was during my first week at Bonnier Zaffre and most of my colleagues seemed excited about this new title by author Sarra Manning. Oh, okay – I thought – another book about London, another girl-meets-boy  book in which they will discover the marvellous city they live in. And well, no need to say I was -obviously – completely wrong.

London Belongs To Us tells the story of seventeen-year-old Sunny, who has always been a little bit of a pushover. However, when she’s sent a picture of her boyfriend kissing another girl, she know she’s got to act. The story presented in the novel presents the reader with a mad, twelve-hour dash around London – starting at 8pm in Crystal Palace (so far away from civilisation you can’t even get the Tube there) then sweeping through Camden, Shoreditch, Soho, Kensington, Notting Hill… and ending up at 8am in Alexandra Palace.

Along the way Sunny will meet a whole host of characters she never dreamed she’d have anything in common with – least of all the handsome (and somewhat vain) French ‘twins’ (they’re really cousins) Jean Luc and Vic. But as this love-letter to London shows, a city is only a sum of its parts, and really it’s the people living there who make up its life and soul. And, as Sunny discovers, everyone – from friends, apparent-enemies, famous bands and even rickshaw drivers – is willing to help a girl on a mission to get her romantic retribution.

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I started reading Sarra’s novel when I was having my hair done in a terrible, terrible place near Kilburn Park station. I had forgotten my book at home but luckily, I was carrying my eBook reader with me and I remembered I had London Belongs To Us ready to be discovered. And what a marvellous read!

As someone who has moved to London from another country, I am fascinated by this city and I find really interesting to discover new things about it. The main character of this novel is young, funny and loves London more than anything else. Her enthusiasm for the city is contagious and the way in which she tells the story is brilliant!  I loved that each chapter in the book began with the name of a place in London followed by a description of its history because it was very interesting to learn more about it.

I also liked to see London’s diversity playing a key role in the book – because if there’s something great about the city, that is its diversity and also the respect that flows throughout its streets – and how the author succeeds in making London a character itself.

I was trapped from the very beginning and laughing out loud all the way through. The plot is fast-paced (the whole story takes place within 12 hours) and is full of fantastic descriptions of people’s feelings. The writing is exceptional – I am already looking forward to reading some other books written by the author – and the characters are adventurous and engaging.

I gave it four stars because I didn’t find the end as satisfying as I’d have loved to. There was something missing there! However, that’s just how I felt about it: some people have told me that the ending didn’t disappoint them and that they really liked it!

I guess you’ll have to read it in order to find out.

May you all have fun with Sunny around London!